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Norma Jeane

“She was a girl who knew how to be happy even when she was sad. And that’s important—you know ” ― Marilyn Monroe

So just today I was answering a few questions on my ask.fm account where my reader was discussing how fashion bloggers don't really paint realism so well (like the whole fashion industry) and that we should be more like lifestyle bloggers. I never really intended my blog to be about anything other than things I'm doing so I've always felt my blog has been my life but as bloggers get better and better photography on their sites  and the standard for outfit posts keeps getting pushed higher and higher and more editorial its often tricky to see where the real life begins and the fantasy ends. Being a big fan of high fashion photography leads me to being a real fan of the editorial look but I agree that a little more personality and detail and a little less generality and platitudes would be appreciate. Though I still consider my personal life just that (personal) I going to endeavour to share a little more of my professional experience with you all as I'm incredibly grateful for supporting me up to this point.

And on that note! Some very glamourous pictures of me - modelling my ass off for one of my favourite Aussie photographers Grant Matthews. I loved getting in character to play the roll of tragic Marilyn for this beauty story - in fact by the end of the shoot I was almost in tears, dragging up tragic thoughts so I could look as emotionally disturbed as possible and swallowing a lump in my throat (yet still trying to look gorgeous, that's important too!). I loved putting on my model hat for this, its so fun to play the true actress. The key to being a good model is knowing your strengths, your silhouette and body type - and then working those to your best advantage. I'm working with dozens of models with amazing figures who simply can't translate the silhouette of their body to the framing of the image. It takes alot of consideration and practice. For example - I have broad shoulders, so I usually keep them at a slight angle or bring up a hand to break up the line in close up image... but there's so much more. The absolute first step is feeling comfortable in front to the lense - and that should be up to the photographer to help you with! I would like to say its one of my assets as a photographer, giving guidance and encouragement where I can, teaching my subject how to get the best from what they are working with. Am I rambling? More on this later!! xx

Photography - Grant Matthews 

Hair and Make-up - Chris Coonrod

Model, me!! :)